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My Time at Portia enters Early Access on Jan 23rd 2018!

Author Topic: Homely vs. Homey  (Read 304 times)

threekitties

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Homely vs. Homey
« on: January 21, 2018, 12:00:41 AM »

I am curious as to your intention when the main character uses the word "homely" to describe her father's shop.

In American English, 'homely' has a negative connotation. It means "plain" or "unattractive" and is most often used to describe an ugly person when social circumstances force you to say something, but you do not wish to be unkind. It would never be used to describe a building.

"Homely" in British English is, apparently, the equivalent of "homey" in American English. It is used to describe a place/dwelling that is warm and inviting, especially when it is well-loved, and regardless of whether or not it is perfectly maintained. Maybe this was what you were trying to convey.

When I first saw the scene where the main character uses the word, "homely", I thought she was someone with a really bad attitude, who was rude and insulting. Then I wondered if you'd really meant "homey," which would reflect her positive outlook and strength of character. Now I'm just curious to know what you actually had in mind.
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MarioneTTe

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Re: Homely vs. Homey
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2018, 09:35:52 PM »

The negative view makes more sense to me.

Remember that the house hasn't been used in multiple years, and is run-down to the point where you have to fix multiple holes in the floor before you can even get a good night's sleep. Not to mention the cracked / broken windows.

As for it describing a building, it's a fairly common descriptor for houses in the area I'm in (in the lower Midwest States), and from what I understand, is even more common in the southern States. It's generally seen as a step above a "fixer-upper" in my area, in that it's livable, but could do with some heavy TLC.
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frances

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Re: Homely vs. Homey
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2018, 06:53:12 PM »

From my American-English understanding of the words, both words mean dramatically different things, but both could make sense in context. (If "homely", she's less enthusiastic about the place, and if "homey", she sees that it's run down but thinks she might be comfortable there.) The intent in-game is less clear because the captioning definitely says "homey" and the actress says "homely". This may have been the actress's natural translation of American English into British English, or if "homey" isn't really a word in B.E., she may have just thought it was a typo.
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